todds seeds logo newBelieve it or not, our seed business all started with grass seed, and by that I mean bentgrass seed.  We saw a demand for bentgrass seed in smaller amounts, like one – ten pounds, instead of the twenty-five pound minimums most companies sold it in.  This got us to thinking that maybe there were other kinds of seeds we could sell and our education began.

The seed industry can be very, very intimidating when you look at the sheer number of hybrids that are out there.  After investigating and learning about the hybrid market we decided that we didn’t want to specialize in hybrid seeds.  We do have some corn seeds that are hybrid, however, none of our seeds are genetically altered, and we do not specialize in hybrid seeds.

We discovered that heirloom and organic seeds were what this industry needed a better supply of.  Chemicals and pathogens present in seed can easily be transmitted to the resulting plant, therefore, if you do not want to be consuming chemicals or ecoli in your food, you need to know that the seed you are buying is also clean, and this is one of the things we excel at.  Our seeds go through several levels of testing, prior to being deemed ready for shipment.  The laboratory that tests our seeds look for SIX different kinds of ecoli disease, even though a couple of the strains are so rare, we don’t ever expect to see them.

We visually inspect everything, and hand pack everything.  Our packaging isn’t that fancy, and while we have a lot of software automation to handle order processing and shipping, the fact of the matter is that our production is all done by hand.  We still believe that the product is more important than the packaging, and we always try to keep our costs down and pass that savings along to our customers.

It’s a privilege serving our customers, and we will always do our best to provide fast answers to questions, and always fast order fulfillment, even if something’s out of stock.  Thank you again for your patronage.

 Posted on : November 14, 2010

24 Responses to “About”
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  1. “We discovered that heirloom and organic seeds were what this industry needed a better supply of. Chemicals and pathogens present in seed can easily be transmitted to the resulting plant, therefore, if you do not want to be consuming chemicals or ecoli in your food, you need to know that the seed you are buying is also clean, and this is one of the things we excel at. Our seeds go through several levels of testing, prior to being deemed ready for shipment. The laboratory that tests our seeds look for SIX different kinds of ecoli disease, even though a couple of the strains are so rare, we don’t ever expect to see them.”

    The listings no longer say from ‘Oklahoma’ as sources are constantly changing. If you need to know the specific location a seed was grown, just ask, as it could be different from month to month as we contract with many different farmers.

  2. i ordered LEMONGRASS seeds and am very happy with them except there is some other seeds mixed in… hearty vines with tiny yellow flowers , can you tell me what could’ve gotten mixed in? I love it.. it’s pretty with the lemongrass… just wanna know the name! Thank you

    1. First, I apologize for how long it took to respond, the system had a glitch that was failing to notify me when I had a comment to respond to. In answer to your question, I am not sure. The thing with the lemongrass is that it’s grown and harvested in India. It’s one of the few seeds we carry that we can’t get grown and harvested here in the USA. Also, because of the nature of how the seed is harvested, there’s no way to come up with 100% pure seed, so there’s always going to be “something else” mixed in with lemongrass. Sounds like you got a better “something else” than most.

      1. Yes i did! It is Beautiful! No complaints at all! I love it! Thanks for the reply! You’ll hear from me soon! Yours Truly, Happiest Customer!!!!

  3. Duane W. says :

    Need instructions for planting gourd seeds

    1. I am so sorry it took so long to respond, the system was not notifying me of new comments. I have added instructions for Gourd Seeds, you can click here to jump to them: GOURD SEED PLANTING INSTRUCTIONS

  4. S Weinstein says :

    Per our conversation this morning, using sprouted wheat to make bread.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZKn59EABn3A

    1. Keep me posted on how everything is working out for you. It’s was nice to meet you, and I apologize for how long it took to get to this comment, as the system was not notifying me properly.

  5. Douglas Maxey says :

    Do I plant the Tokyo long white bunching onion seeds according the the spring onion directions or the Japanese onion instructions? I would rather not wait until August.

    Douglas Maxey
    douglasmaxey@ymail.com

    1. Plant Tokyo Long white seeds very early in the spring in a sunny location as soon as the ground may be cultivated and enriched with organic material. Press soil firmly over Tokyo Long white seeds.

  6. Hi Todd,

    I noticed you are in Michigan. Do you have a storefront I can come and buy your seeds, instead of having them shipped?

    Thanks!

    1. We operate our warehouse in Novi, Michigan, but we are not set up for walkin retail business unfortunately. We may eventually open up retail space, but not sure when/if that’ll happen. In our warehouse we mostly are breaking down the seed from large bags and repackaging into our smaller packets and pounds, and then shipping all day. It would be very difficult to accommodate any retail traffic.

  7. Hello Todd,
    I am looking to purchase a good amount of mung beans, about 50-75# per month, to sprout for the guests at the facility where I work. The only mung beans I have been able to find are from China. My employer does not want mung beans from China. I was hoping you might be able to help. Do you get your mung beans from China? Please let me know if you have any idea where to get organic mung beans that do not come from China. Thanks!
    Sincerely,

    Anne Giacinto, Kitchen manager
    Optimum Health Institute
    6970 Central Ave
    Lemon grove, Ca 91945
    619-589-4022
    agiacinto@optimumhealth.org

    1. Our Mung Beans are grown in Oaklahoma right here in the good old US of A. They are organic and laboratory tested for pathogens, etc. You can purchase them at http://buywholesalecheap.com.

      Let me know if there’s anything else I can do to help. Buying in 55# increments is going to be the cheapest overall cost, so I’d suggest either 55 or 110 pounds at a time.

      Todd

  8. I have been reading about alfalfa sprout contamination outbreaks. Supposedly the seeds can already be contaminated with the bacteria from early on so that even growing them naturally at home with just water can potentially increase the chance of salmonella or e. coli infection. Do your vegetable seeds undergo any decontamination processes or are processed/grown in a clean/sterile manner(possibly without manure)? Are you able to track the seeds to their origins so as to detect any sort of bacterial contamination?

    1. All of our edible seeds go through independent laboratory testing. While what you are saying is true, the testing process we go through allows us to reject entire batches of seeds that show any contamination levels at all. All of our seeds our grown and harvested by farmers adhering to USDA certified organic growing methods. All of our seeds are traceable right back to the farmer. We test for insect contamination, and do a urine screen, feces screen, along with tests for salmonella and e.coli. Still, all the testing we do is not a guarantee that there is no contamination. We make sure that when the seed is stored in a food grade facility, with elevated storage, and properly covered. We suggest that all seed be properly sanitized prior to production.

      1. How do I “properly sanitize” prior to production??

        1. Heat clean water and 3% hydrogen peroxide to 140 degrees F. You need it hot enough to kill bacteria but not too hot to kill the seed so make sure you are right at or around 140 degrees. Lower seeds into hot water in a mesh strainer and leave for 5 minutes, stirring every minute or so. When complete, rinse seeds in room temperature water and voila, your seeds are sanitized!

          All of Todd’s Seeds are already sanitized and tested for pathogens but we do recommend you personally sanitize them just to be on the safe side.

  9. Hi Todd,

    I’m glad to find your site and your seeds. Two things: I’m wondering if you have tips on how to store seed. I bought 5 pounds of wheatgrass, and obviously, I won’t be planting it all at once. How should I store it until I need it?

    Second, when I went to your About page, there was still a reminder from WordPress on how to set up the page. I only recognized it because we did the same thing on our website: fruitforall.wordpress.com. good Luck with your adventure.

    Judith

    1. First, thanks for the heads up on the About page – so many details, so little time, lol. I put up a very short blurb just to eliminate the boilerplate.

      As far as the wheat seed goes, despite what others may say or think, these seeds will last decades with very little thought as to how to store them. Some people say to keep them in the fridge, cooled down, well, okay, that won’t hurt them, but those seeds won’t be any better off than the bag you keep in your pantry closet. I would keep them out of sunlight and excessive temps, but you’re going to have a hard time actually harming them.

  10. Adalberto says :

    Hello, I recelnty bought mung beans from you, but I qould like to know how to make nice sprouts without having to buy an expensive sprouter.

    Can you let me know how to do this?

    I thank you in advance,

    Adalberto

    1. Yes, we have good instructions for sprouts that can be found by clicking SPROUT SPROUTING INSTRUCTIONS.

  11. Hey,

    I received your Marigold seeds and looked online for planting instructions, but you did not post instructions.

    1. Marigolds can be planted using the WILDFLOWER INSTRUCTIONS.

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